Wednesday, 5th July Annual Conference of the Genetics Society of Australasia with the NZ Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

9:00AM - 9:45AM
Main Conference Room
Chair: Lisa Matisoo-Smith
9:45AM - 10:15AM
Foyer (Ground Floor)
10:15AM - 11:15AM
Room 1
Chair: Phillip Wilcox

Chair: Phil Wilcox

Genomic selection and genomic estimated breeding values in genotype by environment data: a proof of concept for RPBC

Brian Cullis, Alison Smith and Paul Jefferson

10.15 am - 10.40 am

 

Selection tools built on factor analytic models for genotype by environment data

Alison Smith and Brian Cullis

10.40 am - 11.15 am

11:20AM - 12:05PM
Main Conference Room
Chair: Anthony Poole
12:05PM - 1:00PM
Foyer (Ground Floor)
12:05PM - 1:00PM
Foyer (Upstairs)

Media and technology is evolving so quickly that making exciting science communication seems both temptingly possible and impossibly scary.  Where do you start?  Come and have lunch while meeting and listening to people who have taken their first steps, dived in, survived and created some fantastic stuff about science - in public?

Confirmed Speakers

Jack Scanlan, PhD Candidate, Melbourne University, Editor-in-Chief, Lateral Magazine.

Joshua Harris, Chiasma Dunedin CEO

Jean Balchin, English Literature Honours student, University of Otago, author of

A History of NZ Science in 25 Objects

Ellen Rykers, Master of Science Communication Student, University of Otago, freelance writer and science communicator.

Jesse Bering, Assoc. Professor, Centre for Science Communication, University of Otago

1:00PM - 1:30PM
Main Conference Room

Evolution of a global superbug

1:30PM - 2:00PM
Main Conference Room
2:00PM - 2:30PM
Main Conference Room
2:30PM - 2:45PM
Main Conference Room
1:00PM - 2:45PM
Room 1
Chair: Michael Knapp

Myth or relict: Does ancient DNA detect the enigmatic Upland seal? Alex Salis

Untangling the evolutionary history of the European Bison  Ayla van Lenen

Madagascar’s extinct elephant birds: what we know from molecular studies  Alicia Grealy

Out of Australia - Are New Zealand's extinct giant birds of prey descendants of recent Australian migrants?  Michael Knapp

Ancient DNA reveals extinction and replacement of New Zealand’s unique flight-reduced semi-terrestrial swans  Nic Rawlence

Ancient DNA from museum specimens: techniques for minimizing damage  Lara Shepherd

Ancient DNA clarifies the evolutionary history, taxonomy and distribution of crested penguins  Theresa Cole

2:00PM - 3:00PM
Room 5
2:45PM - 3:15PM
Foyer (Ground Floor)
3:15PM - 3:35PM
Main Conference Room
Chairs: Katherine Belov & Peter Dearden

Jamie Gongora - University of Sydney

3:15PM - 4:15PM
Room 5
3:40PM - 3:55PM
Main Conference Room
Chairs: Katherine Belov & Peter Dearden

Katherine Harrisson - La Trobe University

4:00PM - 4:20PM
Main Conference Room
Chairs: Katherine Belov & Peter Dearden
4:25PM - 4:50PM
Main Conference Room
Chairs: Katherine Belov & Peter Dearden
4:55PM - 5:55PM
Main Conference Room
Chairs: Katherine Belov & Peter Dearden

Richard Frankham - Macquarie University

6:30PM - 7:15PM
Main Conference Room

In Darwin's day, tracking the process of biological evolution was limited to studying changes and differences in the physical forms of fossils and living species.  For nearly 40 years now, these studies have been supplemented, increasingly powerfully, by DNA analyses.  From comparisons of just a few key DNA sequences, DNA technology itself has evolved to allow evolutionary biologists to compare the entire genomes (all of an organism’s DNA) of species.

In recent years, researchers have begun to integrate DNA from historic and even ancient specimens into such genomic analyses, following the realization that while analyzing modern samples can tell us about the end point of evolutionary processes, inclusion of samples from the past can literally provide insight into the changes as they happened.

We are now seeing the dawn of an era in which population level genomic analyses of ancient and present day populations are possible. Tom will explore the power of such approaches in this talk using human, dog and maize evolution as examples.